1

Crowding Out What Matters

The Connecticut budget is on autopilot – and no one’s at the wheel. State government grows more expensive each year because of expensive promises to state employees and endless borrowing. A half-billion dollar increase in spending doesn’t even cover the growth in these two areas. “We’re in the alarming position of spending a half billion more but cutting services,” said Carol Platt Liebau, Yankee Institute president. The Yankee Institute urges the General Assembly to adopt a budget that does not raise taxes and respects the spending cap. State leaders also need to begin reforming our state workforce to make it Read on →

0

Yankee Institute is hiring!

The Yankee Institute is seeking an operations manager to assist with financial management, organizational effectiveness, and risk management. Our ideal candidate is detail-oriented, committed to Yankee’s mission and culture, and has experience with creating and managing budgets. Twenty hours per week; some time flexibility. Salary negotiable and commensurate with experience. Please send resumes to Carol@YankeeInstitute.org, with “Operations Manager” in the subject line.  

0

Gov. Malloy’s Weapon of Mass Distraction

Apparently, a “permanent fiscal crisis” isn’t enough to keep him busy. Gov. Malloy has now proposed legislation to prohibit businesses from forbidding their employees to disclose their wages. As is evident from its history, the Yankee Institute believes in transparency. The free flow of information is an important part both of what makes capitalism work, and any effort to hold government accountable. We’d be the first to applaud the governor — if he were simply encouraging businesses to permit their employees to discuss wages, rather than seeking to mandate it by law. But it’s no secret that Connecticut businesses feel Read on →

0

Fix Metro North Before Expanding to Springfield

The Yankee Institute supports HB 5949, which would require the Department of Transportation commissioner to prioritize projects, and to put repair of existing infrastructure ahead of building new projects. Clearly our state has infrastructure needs that must be addressed, and we support this committee’s efforts to find ways to fund those infrastructure needs in a responsible way and in a way that does not increase the overall tax burden on Connecticut residents. We are particularly concerned with the state’s $365 million project to develop new infrastructure along the New Haven to Springfield rail line. This project will connect new commuters Read on →

1

High Taxes Hurt

Taxes are a fact of life. When we pay taxes, we’re supporting our roads, our schools, and other important government services. However, when taxes are too high they hurt, especially those who can least afford it. Connecticut’s tax system is out of balance. A better balance would reduce the cost of living, increase pay, and generate opportunities. We are also witnessing the result of what happens when high taxes push people to move out of the state – everyone else has to pay more. The latest Yankee Institute policy brief shows that if the top 357 taxpayers left the state, Read on →

0

Solar Proposal Complicates a Simple Problem

The Yankee Institute is pleased Gov. Malloy and his administration have recognized the failures of Connecticut’s RPS mandates in proposing the Solar Home Renewable Energy Credit. The RPS mandates increase the cost of electricity and create jobs in other states. “Instead of reducing Connecticut’s electricity costs, second highest in the country, this proposal further complicates energy policy. Now in addition to ZRECs, LRECs and the RSIP we have SHREC,” said Zachary Janowski, Yankee’s director of external affairs. “The real solution is much simpler. Pass H.B. 6026 and put these expensive mandates on hold.” Last month, the Yankee Institute released a Read on →

0

State Would Have $5.2 Billion More Under Spending Cap

Connecticut would have $5.2 billion more in its rainy day fund if lawmakers had kept spending under the state’s constitutional spending cap, according to a new Yankee Institute policy brief. The Yankee Institute is urging Gov. Malloy and state legislators to honor the cap in the next two-year budget, which will be released in February. “This budget needs to be the first step toward a sustainable government and fairness for taxpayers. Lawmakers can accomplish these goals by getting state spending under control,” said Carol Platt Liebau, president of the Yankee Institute. “The spending cap is an important – and popular Read on →

1

Lawmakers Have the Power to Lower Electric Bills

A simple change in Connecticut’s laws can put money back into the pockets of electricity consumers, according to a new Yankee Institute report “Restoring Power.” These savings will help those most in need – low-income residents and seniors on a fixed income. The study, written by experts at the Beacon Hill Institute at Suffolk University in Boston, found that with a single change legislators can avoid nearly $1.6 billion of increased electricity costs by 2020. The Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) mandates mean higher costs for homeowners, and even more so for large users of electricity like municipalities and commercial businesses. Read on →

0

They’re back…

The legislature is back in Hartford – and so is the Yankee Institute. After three years “across the river” in East Hartford, the Yankee Institute has made its way back to our capitol city. (Don’t miss the invitation to see our new office at the end of this post.) Last year, we celebrated 30 years of representing taxpayers. This year, we will continue our advocacy for smarter, limited government; fairness for taxpayers; and fewer obstacles to opportunity. In particular, we ask the General Assembly to: Keep the Cap. Respecting the spending cap — a speed limit on the growth of Read on →

0

Bipartisan Concern Over Herbst’s “Overly Generous” Pay Package

Although Connecticut’s median income has decreased by 4% (inflation-adjusted) since he took office, Gov. Dannel Malloy nonetheless just handed out 3%-12% salary increases to political appointees.  Too often, it seems like the government elite gets to live by a different set of rules than those for the taxpayers who subsidize them. Of course, union leaders representing government workers always want us to believe that we’re “in this together.” Well, apparently not. In fact, both Democrat and Republican leaders have expressed concern about the munificent pay package being awarded UConn president Susan Herbst — a 60% increase in the eight years she has run UConn.  By 2019, Read on →

1 2 3 4 5 6 24